Middle School

Classical Greek Paideia, Socratic Seminar and depth of study allow scholars to build the academic rigor and independence required for later success.

A. Fantis Students

The A Fantis Middle School Program is designed to meet the demands of students’ increasingly abstract thinking and logical analysis. Teachers are able to guide students, from the depths of Plato and Shakespeare to the intricacies of algebra and organic chemistry. Middle School is also a lively, social place, where students can begin to assume more independence and responsibility. With daily advisory and weekly one-on-one meetings with faculty and staff, students learn to build the interpersonal and self-management skills needed to tackle more mature topics, such as peer pressure, resolving conflicts and using social media responsibly. True leadership often emerges at this level, with students grabbing opportunities that best suit them, from lead role in the Odyssey, student government or on the basketball court.

A. Fantis Students

Inspired by ancient Greek paideia, the A. Fantis middle school curriculum is carefully structured to offer meaningful content centered around the development of broad, enlightened outlook. The Socratic Seminar, a critical component of paideia, fully flourishes as students tackle increasingly complex texts, enhanced through student-led discussions and analysis. Students engage in meaningful, project-based studies. English and history combine in Humanities, as do science and math in the STEM course. Hellenic Studies is an interdisciplinary approach where students explore The Odyssey and ancient Greek technology.

Amy Miller-Mandel

The close study of classical and contemporary literature cultivates analytical skills and recognition of universal themes. Students work collaboratively and independently to challenge one another through academic discourse and student-focused lessons so they leave with a strong understanding of themselves as readers, writers and global thinkers.

- Amy Miller-Mandel, English Language Arts Chair

Why Learn Greek?

Over 60 percent of all English words have Greek or Latin roots. In the vocabulary of the sciences and technology, the figure rises to over 90 percent.  Indeed, we speak and write Greek every day without realizing it. Western democracy is based on ancient Greek ideals and universal values, from Plato to Hippocrates. We all can better appreciate our own language and culture through the careful study of the Greek language and Hellenism. In addition, learning a second language has many social and cognitive benefits, beyond simple language acquisition. Research has shown the positive influence of learning another language has on the development of the brain and a child’s intellectual abilities. Our Greek Language and Hellenic Studies curriculum is academically rigorous and provides students with an opportunity for interdisciplinary learning that is engaging, meaningful and important.